Gluten free spice brands

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Are you wondering which spice brands you can trust to be gluten free? We get it, finding gluten free spice brands that are safe for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerances can be difficult! That is why we put together this list of all of our favorite gluten free spice brands.

In this article we put a special focus on spice brands that are easily available for purchase online. Different grocery stores have different spice brands in stock at different times so it is often easier to just order spices online if you have dietary restrictions.

Gluten free spice brands: Spicely organics, Morton & Bassett, Badia

Spicely Organics

Spicely is hands down our favorite brand when it comes to gluten free spices! The best part about buying spices through Spicely is that every product they sell is certified gluten free. No more getting your hopes up just to find out that the specific product you were looking at actually contains gluten. 

Spicely sells a wide variety of products including whole spices, ground spices, spice mixes, and more. Any time you are having trouble finding a niche gluten free herb or spice, you should give Spicely a look to see whether they carry it. 

More about Spicely spices

Still have questions about Spicely spices? Here are even more details about Spicely.

  • Are most spices certified gluten free? Yes, per a statement on the FAQ page of Spicely’s website, all of their products are certified gluten free. You heard that right – every single one of the products they sell is certified gluten free!
  • Are most spices organic? Yes, most Spicely products are organic.
  • What sizes do the spices come in? Spicely spices can be purchased in a wide variety of sizes ranging from 0.1 oz taster sizes to 1 pound bulk sizes and beyond. Most popular spices are available in a variety of different sizes.
  • Any other perks? Most Spicely spices are certified gluten free, organic, non-gmo, vegan, and kosher! Their spices are also sourced using Fair Trade options whenever possible. As if that wasn’t enough, their spices are also processed in facilities that do not contain soy, dairy, peanuts, and tree nuts.
  • Where can you buy them? You can find Spicely spices at multiple larger grocery store chains including Whole foods, Bristol Farms, Ralphs, and more. You can also order Spicely products on their website or on their Amazon store. We recommend checking out their Amazon store first if you are just looking to pick up a few products. You are more likely to get free shipping if they have the products you are looking for on Amazon.
  • Where to get up to date information? Refer to the Spicely website to get up to date information on Spicely spices and their gluten content – or lack thereof!

Featured Spicely products

Morton & Bassett

Morton & Bassett is another great brand that carries spices that are certified gluten free. They sell a variety of whole spices, ground spices, and spice mixes. Morton & Bassett does not have as wide of a range of products as Spicely, but they do have some hard to find gems! Most of their spices come in standard sized glass jars. 

More about Morton & Bassett spices

Still have questions about Morton & Bassett spices? Here are some more details

  • Are most spices certified gluten free? Yes, per a statement on the About Us page of their website, all Morton & Bassett products are certified gluten free.
  • Are most spices organic? Morton & Bassett spices are not all organic like Spicely spices. However, many Morton & Bassett spices are organic. They have a line of organic products that include many of the most common spices.
  • What sizes do the spices come in? Most Morton & Bassett spices come in standard sized glass jars that are in the 2 – 5 oz range.
  • Other perks? Per a statement on their website, all Morton & Bassett products are certified gluten free, kosher, and non-gmo. 
  • Where can you buy them? Morton & Bassett spices are available at a variety of grocery stores including Walmart, Fred Meyer, Safeway, and more. Their products can also be purchased online on their online store or their Amazon store. We recommend checking out their Amazon store first if you are just looking to pick up a few products. You are more likely to get free shipping if they have the products you are looking for on Amazon. 
  • Where to get up to date information? Refer to the Morton & Bassett website for the most up to date information on their products.

Featured Morton & Bassett products

Badia

Badia is another brand that is great about labeling their gluten free products. Their products are not all certified gluten free like Spicely spices, but they do reliably label their gluten free spices. No more wondering whether that obscure reference to ‘starch’ on the ingredients list is wheat in disguise.  Unlike Spicely, which mainly focuses on spices and similar products, Badia sells a large variety of products. Some of their products are gluten free and others are not, but they clearly label all of the products that are gluten free. 

More about Badia spices

Still have questions about Badia spices? Here are even more details about Badia.

  • Are most spices certified gluten free? Their spices are not necessarily certified gluten free, but most of their spices are gluten free and clearly labeled as so. Nothing is left up to a guess.
  • Are most spices organic? Not all of Badias spices are organic, but they do have a line of organic spices that are labeled as gluten free. This line contains organic versions of many of the most popular spices.
  • What sizes do the spices come in? Badia spices come in a wide variety ranging from 0.5 oz taster sizes to to 6 lb bulk sizes and beyond. 
  • Other perks? Many of Badias spices are kosher/halal and clearly labeled as so.
  • Where can you buy them? Badia spices can be purchased at a variety of grocery stores including large chains like Target, Kroger, Walmart, and more. You can also purchase many of their products online through Amazon.
  • Where to get up to date information? For the most up to date information on Badia products, head over to the Badia website

Featured Badia products

Edward & Sons

Edward & Sons is not going to be your one stop shop for gluten free spices in the same way that Spicely will. However, we wanted to mention Edward & Sons because they offer a few niche products that are definitely worth having on your radar! Edward & sons is our go-to brand for bouillon cubes and they offer a variety of amazing bouillon cubes that are gluten free and vegan friendly. They have a convenient allergen table on their website that makes it easy to identify products that are gluten free.

Featured Edwards & Sons products

Spice hunter

Spice hunter is far from an entirely gluten free brand, but they do offer some fun products that are certified gluten free. This includes a variety of dip mixes and rubs. They have a table on the FAQ page on their website that details which spices and spice mixes are certified gluten free. 

Featured spice hunter products

What spice brands do you use?

Do you have a favorite gluten free spice brand that was not mentioned in this article? Leave us a comment and let us know all about your favorite brand! We are regularly updating this article with new products and brands that we think are notable. 

Disclaimer. We are only passing on information that is publicly available on the internet. If you have further questions about gluten content and any of these brands, you should reach out to the brands themselves. They are the ultimate authority on whether their products are gluten free or not. The information in this article was originally posted on 02/27/2021. 


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3 thoughts on “Gluten free spice brands”

    1. I have not personally used Smidge and Spoon spices because I usually stick with brands that are explicitly labeled as gluten free, so the short answer is I can not be 100% sure.

      For what it’s worth, I know that Smidge and Spoon is a Kroger brand and I have generally found that Kroger is good about labeling allergens (ex. putting ‘may contain’ labels on products that are made on shared equipment with wheat, dairy, etc.), so if I did not have access to brands that explicitly labeled their products then that would probably be one of the first brands I tried.

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